Fluidity

by Deborah Winiarski

Wax in its molten state flows. It is the fluid nature of wax that is inherent in the encaustic process. The combination of heat and wax presents the greatest challenge to artists working in the medium, yet in turn provides its richest rewards. Conversely, it is the intentional and precise control of the wax flow that allows a spontaneous and fluid expression of movement. When happy accidents do occur, it takes an artist’s eye, heart, and mind to see them and hold on to them or to decide to let them go.

Artists, when they are truly that, access what I call an inner creative fluidity. It is their highly creative and intuitive thoughts and emotions, together with their skill, expertise, and experience that make Art possible. The creative life is never static. It is a forever evolving, fluid, and vibrant way of being.

The artists included here are highly attuned to their creative fluidity and have taken the concept of fluidity beyond the literal. Their works flow metaphorically, conceptually, emotionally, musically, linearly, physically. They reflect on geologic processes, weather patterns, self-examinations, socio-environmental interactions, microscopic organisms, and beauty. They flow – wholly and singularly.

 


“My work is about energy and spatial ambiguity. The tension between figure and ground results in amorphous shapes layered with vibrant, exuberant colors that possess a strangely beautiful power and energy. Feelings of dissonance, mystery, and unease prevail. The work represents the ideas of the journey, the flight, and the search.”
– Binnie Birstein

Binnie Birstein, A.I.R., 2014, encaustic and graphite on panel, 30” x 40”

Binnie Birstein, A.I.R., 2014, encaustic and graphite on panel, 30” x 40”.  Photo credit: Elisa Keogh


“I am interested in making objects that are enigmatic and personal, ambiguous yet engaging. The surfaces of my ‘Rhythmo Box’ series contain rhythmic, scored marks into plaster and wax.”
– Lynette Haggard

Lynette Haggard, Rhythmo Box No. 2, 2010; resin, beeswax, pigment, foam, plaster, 10” x 13” x 9”

Lynette Haggard, Rhythmo Box No. 2, 2010; resin, beeswax, pigment, foam, plaster; 10” x 13” x 9”


“In the ‘Microcosm/Macrocosm?’ series, I explore the connections that exist between the cosmos, the terrestrial, and the cellular worlds. The work is a visual account of the human condition through a fantastic voyage of vast atmospheres and biomorphic shapes.”
– Gregory Wright

Gregory Wright, Elemental Antithesis, 2009; encaustic, oil, pigment, shellac on birch, 20” x 48”

Gregory Wright, Elemental Antithesis, 2009; encaustic, oil, pigment, shellac on birch; 20” x 48”


“I make organic, encaustic-covered sculptural forms. I intend my work to be disturbing, funny, and sometimes sexual. It’s about human foibles and disasters. The work – founded formally, conceptually, and technically in history, history, history – rests on Barbara Kingsolver’s ‘Poisonwood Bible’ concept that misunderstanding is the cornerstone of civilization.”
– Pamela Blum

Pamela Blum, Dress-up, 2010; encaustic on paper mache, plaster gauze, wire mesh, 34” x 9 ¾” x 9"

Pamela Blum, Dress-up, 2010; encaustic on paper mache, plaster gauze, wire mesh; 34” x 9 ¾” x 9″


“My work reflects a longstanding interest in environmental change, infectious disease, and our individual and communal responses to our altered world. Over the years, my work has progressed from drawings inspired by microscopic imagery to room-sized environments steeped in the research of epidemiology and the social history of infectious disease.”
– Lorrie Fredette

Lorrie Fredette, (more/less) Reflective, 2010; beeswax, tree resin, muslin, brass, steel, wood, nylon line, 8’ x 12’ x 6’. Photo credit:  Richard Edelman

Lorrie Fredette, (more/less) Reflective, 2010; beeswax, tree resin, muslin, brass, steel, wood, nylon line; 8’ x 12’ x 6’. Photo credit: Richard Edelman


“My work references nature from an aerial perspective observed during cross-country flights in a single engine plane to the view through a microscope.”
– Pamela Wallace

Pamela Wallace, Brood, 2014, encaustic on panel, 8” x 8”

Pamela Wallace, Brood, 2014, encaustic on panel, 8” x 8”


“Utilizing processes such as burning, rusting, decomposition, burying, or weather exposure, layers of fabric are collaged with encaustic, images, and found materials. Through pattern and materials, narratives interact with and contextualize the markings, as well as speak to our wants, needs, temptations, and desires.”
– Lorraine Glessner

Lorraine Glessner, Under the Bridge, 2013; encaustic, mixed media, horse and human hair on composted and branded silk on wood, 48” x 48”

Lorraine Glessner, Under the Bridge, 2013; encaustic, mixed media, horse and human hair on composted and branded silk on wood; 48” x 48”


“Though still, my work incorporates and sings movement. In the most recent ‘Relief’ series, elements flow over and around the edges of the picture plane. Monotyped fabrics are cut, sewn, woven, curled, crumpled, and collaged onto the painting surface creating a visual dance of form and color.”
– Deborah Winiarski

Deborah Winiarski, Saffron III, 2014; encaustic, fabric, thread, oil on panel, 25” x 21” x 5”

Deborah Winiarski, Saffron III, 2014; encaustic, fabric, thread, oil on panel; 25” x 21” x 5”


 “Musicality is established through pattern, variety, and intensity. My recent ‘Étude’ series draws the viewer into an abstract musical world. The understated presence of the composition captivates then ultimately satisfies with its meditative rhythm.”
– Winston Lee Mascarenhas

Winston Lee Mascarenhas, Étude No.1/Op.8, 2014, encaustic on panel, 10” x 10”

Winston Lee Mascarenhas, Étude No.1/Op.8, 2014, encaustic on panel, 10” x 10”


“’Pendulum Series’ was created on encaustic-painted panels positioned on the studio floor that received marks made with a wax-drizzling pendulum that was swung, pushed, and propelled. Having been aware of the tension created between the mechanical symmetry and organic flow, I played with the relationship between control and the lack thereof.”
– Kim Bernard

Kim Bernard, Drishti, 2011, encaustic on panel, 48” x 48”

Kim Bernard, Drishti, 2011, encaustic on panel, 48” x 48”


“Documenting the dramatic interaction created by light on water through seasonal shifts, this is my own research into the sublime. In the end, my work is based on memory, both the memory of place and my connection to the emotional qualities held by light and color.”
– Carol Pelletier

Carol Pelletier, West Beach, 2013, oil and cold wax on panel, 13” x 13”

Carol Pelletier, West Beach, 2013, oil and cold wax on panel, 13” x 13”


“My artwork explores the breadth of metaphoric meaning that can be derived from non-objective abstraction. Through mixed media paintings, drawings, and prints, I make paradoxical concepts tangible with formal elements, such as the repeated use of the color black, acting as both presence and absence, simultaneously weighted and ephemeral.”
– Toby Sisson

Toby Sisson, Timeline of Seemingly Unrelated Events IV, 2010; encaustic, oil, charcoal, and silver leaf on wood, 24” x 48”

Toby Sisson, Timeline of Seemingly Unrelated Events IV, 2010; encaustic, oil, charcoal, and silver leaf on wood; 24” x 48”


“With allegiance to no particular religion, my paintings are prayers and/or meditations. The dots made with hot tools were placed freehand, creating a motion that represents the fragility of the human spirit. ‘Prayers for the Earth: Belly’ was inspired by my 14 year old cat, Paris Frankenstein.”
– Fanne Fernow

Fanne Fernow, Prayers for the Earth: Belly, 2011, encaustic on two panels, 24” x 48”

Fanne Fernow, Prayers for the Earth: Belly, 2011, encaustic on two panels, 24” x 48”

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