Off The Grid . . .

by Deborah Winiarski

Pattern in Art may be defined as a reiteration or rational distribution of closely related elements across a given plane or field. That distribution may vary with different degrees of predictability within a composition. A pattern in a work of Art need not necessarily repeat itself but often provides order, offering a strand of unified elements within a larger structural whole.

Though each of the works below visually make reference to some form of pattern, they are far from predictable. These artists have used their affinity toward a reiteration of elements – whether geometrical, kaleidoscopic, musical, or textile in nature – as a starting point from which to sing their singular songs.

The word ‘pattern’ is derived from the Medieval Latin word ‘patronus’ meaning ‘a model of behavior, exemplar.’ Each of the artists included here are exemplars in their distinctive and unique uses of pattern in their work.

 


Dawna Bemis, Kaleidoscope, 2015; encaustic, encaustic monotypes, newsprint, transistors and pigment stick on steel; 24” x 24”. Photography:  Jay York

Dawna Bemis, Kaleidoscope, 2015; encaustic, encaustic monotypes, newsprint, transistors and pigment stick on steel; 24 x 24 inches. Photography: Jay York

 

Dawna Bemis, Antique Tile, 2014; encaustic, encaustic monotypes, book pages, hand stitching, embroidery and pigment stick on copper on panel; 16” x 16”, Photography:  Jay York

Dawna Bemis, Antique Tile, 2014; encaustic, encaustic monotypes, book pages, hand stitching, embroidery and pigment stick on copper on panel; 16 x 16 inches. Photography: Jay York

“In my most recent series I draw upon quilts as a metaphor for the loss of generational knowledge transfer.   With this work I explore issues of identity, gender, and family history. As I develop these pieces, I connect with the many hands that have worked these geometric patterns over time.”
–Dawna Bemis


Cat Crotchett, Surfacing, 2015, encaustic and mixed media on panel, 8” x 8”

Cat Crotchett, Surfacing, 2015, encaustic and mixed media on panel, 8 x 8 inches

 

Cat Crotchett, Together, 2013, encaustic and mixed media on panel, 8” x 8”

Cat Crotchett, Together, 2013, encaustic and mixed media on panel, 8 x 8 inches

“In these pieces I explored what happened to each pattern’s individual and collective identities when they were layered or juxtaposed in wax. It plays with ideas of cultural dominance relative to what parts of each pattern are concealed or revealed.”
— Cat Crotchett


Joanne Mattera, Chromatic Geometry 40, 2015, encaustic on panel, 18” x 18”

Joanne Mattera, Chromatic Geometry 40, 2015, encaustic on panel, 18 x 18 inches

 

Joanne Mattera, Chromatic Geometry 27, 2014, encaustic on panel, 18” x 18”

Joanne Mattera, Chromatic Geometry 27, 2014, encaustic on panel, 18 x 18 inches

“In my Chromatic Geometry series I’ve skewed the grid’s conventional structure into a field of attenuated diamonds. Formally I’m thinking about their division into lesser or greater amounts, allowing me to resolve relationships of color and structure. Each little triangular shape is a fulcrum affecting the equipoise of the field.”
— Joanne Mattera


Karen Freedman, Ruche Off 0565.2, 2015, encaustic on wood panel, 30" x 40" (diptych)

Karen Freedman, Ruche Off 0565.2, 2015, encaustic on wood panel, 30 x 40 inches (diptych)

 

Karen Freedman, Ruche Off 0507.6, 2014, encaustic on wood panel, 16” x 32”

Karen Freedman, Ruche Off 0507.6, 2014, encaustic on wood panel, 16 x 32 inches

“I have always been drawn to patterns. With my series, Kaleidoscoptical, I explore ways to alter visual perception and cognition through the interaction of color within the confines of symmetrical patterning.”
–Karen Freedman


Paul Rinaldi, The Kiss, 2015; encaustic on 2 panels, steel support; 28.5" x 14.5

Paul Rinaldi, The Kiss, 2015; encaustic on 2 panels, steel support; 28.5 x 14.5 inches

 

Paul Rinaldi, Etude No. 18 Voices, 2012, encaustic on four panels, 10.2” x 32.2”

Paul Rinaldi, Etude No. 18 Voices, 2012, encaustic on four panels, 10.2 x 32.2 inches

“I create objects that invite a viewer to a moment of inner contemplation and reflection, objects that in some way offer a gateway to both collective and individuated memory.  I want to produce work that somehow collapses time, where one experiences both the fullness and the silence of an expansive moment.”
— Paul Rinaldi


Tremain Smith, Forest of Delight, 2014; oil, wax and collage on panel; 24” x 30”.  Photography: Karen Mauch

Tremain Smith, Forest of Delight, 2014; oil, wax and collage on panel; 24 x 30 inches.
Photography:  Karen Mauch

 

Tremain Smith, Identity, 2014, oil and wax on panel, 24” x 36”.  Photography:  Karen Mauch

Tremain Smith, Identity, 2014, oil and wax on panel, 24 x 36 inches.
Photography:  Karen Mauch

“I use the grid as a structure that I build upon in layers. My technique is composed of oil glazes, collage and transparent beeswax. I incise, iron, rub, draw, and paint into the layers, and burn imprints into the wax with a desire to express the spiritual through painting.”
— Tremain Smith


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